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Brie Larson Calls for More Film Critics of Color: ‘I Don’t Want to Hear What a White Man Has to Say’

Brie Larson wants to see more underrepresented reporters in the entertainment industry. At the Crystal + Lucy Awards, the actress announced that the Sundance Film Festival and the Toronto Film Festival have pledged 20 percent of their credentials for minorities to better reflect America. Larson was on hand to accept the Crystal Award for Excellence […].....»»

Category: topSource: varietyJun 14th, 2018

Brie Larson Advocates for Diverse Critics at Women In Film Crystal + Lucy Awards 2018!

Ellen Pompeo, Brie Larson and Alison Brie hit the carpet while attending the Women In Film 2018 Crystal + Lucy Awards presented by Max Mara, Lancôme and Lexus at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on Wednesday (June 13) in Beverly Hills, Calif. The three ladies were joined at the event by Katherine Langford, Alice Eve, Regina [...] Ellen Pompeo, Brie Larson and Alison Brie hit the carpet while attending the Women In Film 2018 Crystal + Lucy Awards presented by Max Mara, Lancôme and Lexus at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on Wednesday (June 13) in Beverly Hills, Calif. The three ladies were joined at the event by Katherine Langford, Alice Eve, Regina Hall, Lake Bell, Michaela Watkins, Kate Flannery, Jane Lynch, Shohreh Aghdashloo, Rosanna Arquette, Diane Warren, Alexandra Shipp, Katherine McNamara, Chloe x Halle, Julissa Bermudez and Francia Raisa. Brie was honored with The Crystal Award for Excellence in Film and took the opportunity to demand more diversity in film reviews. “I don’t need a 40-year-old white dude to tell me what didn’t work about A Wrinkle in Time,” Brie said. “It wasn’t made for him! I want to know what it meant to women of color, biracial women, to teen women of color.” “Am I saying I hate white dudes? No, I am not,” Brie continued. “What I am saying is if you make a movie that is a love letter to women of color, there is an insanely low chance a woman of color will have a chance to see your movie, and review your movie.” FYI: Brie is wearing a Carolina Herrera dress. Alison, Alexandra and Katherine Langford are wearing Max Mara. Katherine McNamara is wearing HUGO......»»

Category: topSource: justjaredJun 14th, 2018

Brie Larson Calls for Film Critics of Color: 'I Don't Want to Hear What a White Man Has to Say' - Variety

U.S. News & World ReportBrie Larson Calls for Film Critics of Color: 'I Don't Want to Hear What a White Man Has to Say'VarietyAt the Crystal + Lucy Awards, the actress announced that the Sundance Film Festival and the Toronto Film Festival have pledged 20 percent of their credentials for minorities to better reflect America. Larson was on hand to accept the Crystal Award for ...Sundance, Toronto to Allocate 20 Percent of Credentials to Underrepresented Critics, Says Brie LarsonHollywood ReporterBrie Larson Says Sundance And Toronto Festivals To Allocate 20% Of Press Credentials To Underrepresented ...DeadlineBrie Larson Promises 'I Do Not Hate White Dudes,' But Laments Lack of Inclusion Among Film CriticsIndieWireall 44 news articles ».....»»

Category: topSource: googlenewsJun 14th, 2018

Podcasts You Should Know: Taking Risks with Kevin Allison

Kevin Allison made many of us laugh during his time on MTV’s cult comedy series, The State. These days, he’s still making us laugh, and cry, and think. Kevin is […] More The post Podcasts You Should Know: Taking Risks with Kevin Allison appeared first on Socialite Life. Kevin Allison made many of us laugh during his time on MTV’s cult comedy series, The State. These days, he’s still making us laugh, and cry, and think. Kevin is the host of the amazing storytelling podcast RISK! On the show, which arose from a series of successful live shows in New York and Los Angeles, people from all walks of life tell true stories “they never thought they’d dare to share.” I had the chance to chat with Kevin about the show’s origins and how he is able to provide listeners with emotional, hilarious and often relatable stories. Socialite Life: How did you end up going from sketch comedy to storytelling? Kevin Allison: I was in a sketch comedy group called The State and we had a show on MTV from 1993 to 1995 – and then, in 1996, the group broke up and I was devastated by that breakup. I remember the day we were fired. We quit MTV and tried to go to CBS, and Les Moonves fired us immediately. He had just been hired to take over CBS. He was like, “I don’t have time to think about a bunch of kids making sketch comedy. Just fire them right away even though we just hired them.” And I remember I went back to my apartment that night and laid down on my floor and my body was shaking, because I was so distraught. And the reason I was so distraught was because I had attained a level of success with that group of people. I was on television, there were all sorts of prospects of how to go up, up, up in the whole Hollywood and TV world and all of a sudden, it was all gone because the group was all of a sudden maybe no longer going to exist. And I really didn’t have the confidence that I could create a career on my own as a solo performer. I was just so insecure about the fact that I’m so unusual. I was so insecure about the fact that I’m SO gay and so kinky and do Midwestern and so, I don’t know, intellectual and sincere – and all sorts of things that I never felt like added up to something that would be really appealing to a Hollywood casting director. I just always thought of myself as being too odd. So, 12 years after The State broke up, I was trying everything I could think of to forge a solo career. I was doing one-man shows and I was auditioning for commercials and indie movies. I was pitching television shows to Comedy Central, but I was terrified. I was filled with stage fright and I just wasn’t comfortable in my own skin yet. I was very reliant on playing old crazy, kooky characters, like I had been with the sketch comedy group. I did that for 12 years, and was getting nowhere. I was a starving artist. I mean, in order to live, most of what I was doing was cater waitering – and getting recognized left and right by people because I was still on TV in reruns. SL: Where did the idea for RISK! come from? Kevin Allison: It was in 2009 that I did a solo show of crazy, kooky characters, called F-Up, about five characters who f-ed up their careers. For example, there was one character who was a Jewish vaudevillian and actor from the 20s who used to be in a comedy group, but his partners went off to LA to become multimillionaires and left him behind. So, clearly, there was some autobiography in that. I did this solo show at San Francisco Sketchfest in 2009 and (fellow State alum) Michael Ian Black came to see it. And afterwards, I asked him, “What did you think?”, because I thought the show was a failure that night. And he said, “I think the audience just wanted you to drop the act and stop playing these characters, stop hiding behind a mask and start getting upon stage and just be you. Tell your own stories. Your life is amazingly interesting.” And I said, “Oh, I’m so terrified to hear that because I’m just afraid I’m too gay and too kinky and too Midwestern” and all these things. I said, “It feels too risky.” And he said, “THAT is the word to latch onto. Like, if what you’re doing feels risky, then it probably means you’re opening up to the audience and they’ll open up to you.” So, I went back to New York after that experience and on the flight home, I thought, “I’m going to tell the riskiest story I can imagine telling in front of an audience as soon as I’m back in New York.” And the riskiest story I could think of at the time was about the first time I prostituted myself, when I was 23-years-old. I went up on stage at the UCB Theater in Chelsea and I told this story and I was stunned – because there was such a difference in the feeling between myself and the audience. I was looking right into their eyes, which I was very un-used to doing when being on stage. When you’re playing a character, you’re kind of reciting memorized stuff. But now I felt like I was having a conversation with them – and there was just this energy coming back at me where every time I thought, “Oh, that sounded too gay or too Midwestern, or whatever it might be, I realized, “Oh, no, they continue to lean forward and this is really resonating with them.” So, I left the theater that night and I walked away, down 8th Avenue and the whole idea of RISK! occurred to me at that moment, during that walk. I thought, “I’m going to create a show. It has to be a live show because I had to force my frightened little ass to get up on stage on a regular basis. I’ve been avoiding that my whole life, I’ve got to start doing that regularly in order to get comfortable in front of an audience. And, it should be a podcast – which I was just learning about at the time – because small room comedy isn’t going to get you anywhere; you need a larger audience.” .IRPP_minimalist { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#FFFFFF; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #141414!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist:active, .IRPP_minimalist:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_minimalist .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#000000; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } RELATED:  An Early Halloween Treat – Socialite Life Chats With Elvira! SL: How did you decide the format of the podcast? Kevin Allison: I thought it should be live stories, stories told on stage and radio-style stories, because I’ve always loved putting together an audio story sort of thing. I used to play with a Radio Shack tape recorder when I was a kid all of the time. So, it all came together for me and I realized that the deal with the show is everyone is coming out of the closet about something. Everyone is stepping outside of their comfort zone and speaking to the audience in a way they never really thought they’d be totally comfortable talking in mixed company about – about the things that have happened in their life that have made them feel the most emotional – or just the most revealing – the kinds of things they would normally talk about with their therapist. And, amazingly, that idea immediately resonated with everyone I asked to do the show. People were like, “That’s a great idea.” Because it can be like The Moth or This American Life but it can also go places where those shows can’t go because they’re on NPR. I remember I started listening to those shows at that same time and I was so struck by Ira Glass saying before one of the stories on the show, “I have to warn the audience. This next story acknowledges the existence of sex.” And I was like, “Oh, there is definitely room for a storytelling show that is not afraid to go way deep into that sort of stuff without making apologies.” SL: The interstitial music on RISK! is amazing. How are you able to find songs that connect so well with the stories? Kevin Allison: You know, it’s so funny, because with the podcast, I have found that it has perfectly blended so many of these tiny little ways of being creative that go all the way back to when I was a kid. When I was a kid, my first obsession was with records. I loved listening to records. My parents, my brothers, my sisters – everyone in my family had big record collections. And, also, I was never much into listening to an album. I was always focusing on specific single tracks. I used to make mixtapes when I was a kid – like a maniac – and I always had very eclectic tastes too. And there really is something incredibly…I don’t know…it really does scratch a creative itch to make a good mixtape, where one song leads into the next in a really dynamic way and you feel like you’re getting a really wonderful mix of different colors and tones. So, yes, I have always been obsessed with finding new music, especially new singles or just specific songs and when I started creating RISK!… those first two seasons are especially weird. Because back then we were in the “wild, wild west” of the internet and we didn’t know what we had the rights to use or not so we were using either stuff that was on free music archives online or we were using stuff where we wrote to the band and got their permission or we were using stuff where the band just literally made the song for the show. So, those first two years of the show are really weird with the mix of what you’re hearing. But, eventually, we were able to afford to buy licenses. Now, we can play literally almost any song that’s out there because we have like three different music licenses to play whatever. So, the internet has figured out how to handle all of that with podcasts and now there’s a lot of freedom but I can’t believe how much searching it still takes. I still constantly as people if they can recommend new bands for me to listen to. I’ll just flat-out ask the fans on our Facebook page, send me some songs I should check out. I’ll use stuff like Spotify or Pandora, like little algorithms to help me discover new stuff, like “this song might sound a little bit like that song.” I’m constantly searching for music, and it’s not very time effective. I think an unusual amount of time goes into deciding the songs that end up on the show but I’m very proud of it and I think our Best of RISK! Music episodes – every five or so months, we’ll do an episode that’s just the best songs we’ve had on the show in the past few months. I think that those are spectacular. I think those are so wonderful to listen to at parties and stuff like that. SL: Is there a story that was told on the podcast that still resonates with you to this day? Kevin Allison: Well, I have always been spectacularly fascinated with a story Mollena Williams shared on the show I don’t know how many years ago. The story is called “Slave”. It’s a radio-style story and what was fascinating about it was I knew the broad strokes of what happened in this incident she lived through, but I didn’t really know the whole story. And she came over to my apartment and she just kind of improvised it, just very conversational, just chatting with me. But it really comes off like it’s extremely well thought out and almost like a written short story or something like that – which is very rare, I mean, usually on our end we have to edit and edit and edit to make a person sound a lot more eloquent than they actually were when we first recorded them. But I think what was so fascinating about the story was…like, I’m a kinky person, so I’m always fascinated with people exploring things sexually or erotically that are unusual or maybe even a little taboo or a little dangerous. [Mollena] is a black woman and she was raised in the projects in Harlem and she grew up as a feminist, like very, very conscious and woke about race and power dynamics and all of that, but she had this kink, like ever since she was a little girl, of wanting to play a submissive, sort of slave-like role with someone. So, as she got into the kink community, in her 20s or so in San Francisco, she started to wonder if she could play what they now call “race play”, where you take racial tension and you make that the central focus of the behavioral roleplay between a dominant and a submissive person in an erotic situation. With Reservation / Mindy Tucker So, she started experimenting with that and, at first, she had a really fun time with it, you know, she had people who were very tongue-in-cheek and she had a lot of trust with them and all of that. But then she tried it with a guy who was very, very intense and she didn’t know him quite as well, and they didn’t negotiate it quite well enough. There was some confusion about the negotiation of how they were going to play and she found herself in this roleplay scene with him that was almost like 12 Years a Slave, where she’s like the escaped slave girl sort of thing and he’s the redneck cracker with a bull whip and the whole nine yards and something happened to her psychologically while she was playing where she lost grasp of reality. She started to be unable to remember that she had a safe word and this was just a game, and it started to become a truly traumatic situation for her. The reason I find that story so fascinating is because I think it really is risky of Mollena to be sharing that. People have a wide range of reactions to it but what I love about it is that she’s able to acknowledge and honor her mixed feelings. At the end of the story, she says, “If you’re thinking of doing something like this, any sort of taboo play in the kink realm, you really have to think through it first, like what you can handle, because you might just uncover something psychologically that might be a lot bigger, an emotion that you had planned on dealing with, and it can be pretty dangerous.” It did traumatize her for a while. But she ends it by saying it can also be very, very hot and that’s what I love about stories is that stories don’t have to be black or white, or this way or that way, they can honor those mixed emotions and to hear someone really unpack all of that in depth is really quite impressive. I love that about what we do with the show. SL: Do you think everyone has a RISK!-worthy story inside of them? Kevin Allison: I think everyone has lots of stories in them. What I always tell people is what we’re interested in is those moments from your life when you were most either emotionally wound up or fascinated or you really felt like you were learning something about yourself, like we have these peak experiences, often times it will be your first time doing something, like the night you lost your virginity, and then other times it will be like terrible or wonderful surprises, like a car accident you were in, or you tried mushrooms for the first time and it was like a magical experience. We have these peak experiences in our life and it’s very much worth sitting down and going back and trying to recreate it, because once you start walking through some of those memories and trying to make sense of it all, you’ll have more memories that start creeping in. And you might think, “Oh, I don’t remember all that much about that” or “Oh, it wasn’t that big of a deal, the whole thing took place in only about ten minutes.” But once you start trying to remember and really re-experience it as you’re talking about it, other memories start filtering in and you really begin to have more of a grasp on the entire experience. That’s why people do therapy, by the way. It’s trying to walk through some of these experiences and revisit them and kind of like make something new out of them. So that’s what storytelling is – you’re sharing with someone about a moment that was particularly resonant for you and your hope is that, in sharing that, it will resonate somehow with the listener as well. SL: How long does it take to get someone ready to tell their story on stage or on the podcast? Kevin Alison: Well, New York and Los Angeles are our shows where we’re working a lot with people who are pretty experienced with getting up on stage. So, with those people, it’s like pulling teeth just getting them to agree to work with you because they’re all so full of themselves that they’re like, “No, I don’t have to work with you before the show.” But, when we go, for example, we’re about to go to Cincinnati and Cleveland next month, and what we’ll do is say on the podcast, “Hey, Cincinnati, we’re coming to town, so pitch us your stories.” So, about 20 people from Cincinnati pitch us their stories. They send in like 300-word long descriptions of what they have in mind and then the ones that sound really interesting to us, we’ll say, “Can you make a 15-minute recording of you attempting to tell that story for the first time?” Just a first draft. Then, after we listen to those, then we actually cast the show, and we’ll usually have them go through two more drafts before the show. SL: That’s quite a lot of work. Kevin Allison: It is rather an involved process, and part of the reason it’s so involved is because we want to make sure that everyone getting up on stage is happy with what they’re doing. We want to make sure people have really processed all their emotions and are really ready to do this and we also want to make sure that we’ve done enough poking and prodding at these people to make sure that they really are uncovering all, lifting up all of the rocks to see all the stuff in their stories they might not have thought of in a long time. I have to laugh, because so often when I’m working with someone on a story, I do sound like a therapist because I’ll ask questions like, “Yeah, but what do you think your mother was really thinking at that moment?” or “Oh, is there anything you wanted to say at that moment but you held your tongue?” You know, I ask those kinds of things which kind of get people thinking, “Oh my gosh, yeah, there was something I wanted to say that I didn’t say” and then, all of a sudden, there’s a lot more to unpack there. .IRPP_minimalist { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#FFFFFF; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #141414!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist:active, .IRPP_minimalist:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_minimalist .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#000000; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } RELATED:  Socialite Life Chats with America’s Got Talent’s Breakout Season 13 Star, Hans! SL: What is your advice for aspiring storytellers? Kevin Allison: My first bit of advice is to listen to “What every RISK! storyteller should know.” It’s about an hour long and it’s me giving tips on what really makes a story pop. And what it is, other than what I was talking about before, about how important it is to zero in on just a few incidents that are particularly meaningful for you, is that you really want to flesh those incidents out, you want to be like, “Okay, that night that I did lose my virginity, what do I remember about the look in her eyes and can I recall what temperature was the room and what were those clothes I was wearing? And what was that feeling I got in my gut at that one point?” You need to really get into the sense memory of what that experience was like in the nitty gritty, so that you can really take us there in a cinematic way to re-experience very specific moments. A lot of people have this bad habit of telling us the gist of what someone said. They’ll be like, “My Dad said I had to get out of the house as soon as possible because he really wanted me out of there.” Instead, you should say, “My Dad turned to me and pointed his finger in my face and he said, ‘Now you look here, buddy. I want you out of here’”…so you really hear him saying the dialogue. It’s really about zeroing in on those really specific moments of lived experience and then remembering all the sights and sounds and smells and tastes and details like that where you can really kind of cinematically bring it to life for us, so we feel like we’re there watching it happen. SL: What is the coolest reaction you’ve gotten from a fan of the podcast? Kevin Allison: Oh my God, there have been so, so, so many. You know it was really cute, we were in Austin a few years ago and this couple came up to me and they said they had been married for 15 years and they were determined to get divorced, like they had been talking…not in heated emotion, but in like “It looks like this is over. We really should get divorced.” So, they had been talking about that for a while and had not been looking forward to the divorce process but knew that it had to happen. Then they started listening to RISK! and they started hearing these kinky stories on the show, because there’s a lot of them on the show. And, in the process, they both realized that – each of them realized separately, “Oh my God, we’re kinky!” Like they had never done a lot of this stuff. But hearing people talk about it, they were like “Oh my God, we could be doing this!” So, they started trying kinky things together and they said to me after this Austin show, they came up to me and said, “We have sex every night now and the divorce is off the table.” (Laughs) But a lot of people have come up and said they were suicidal at one point, or just going through a really rough patch. Occasionally it’s a little shocking to hear someone say that they started listening when they were 12-years-old. (Laughs) They’ll be like, “Oh my God, you raised me!” (Laughs) But pretty much every day we’ll get these emails from people with these amazing experiences. It is really funny and endearing to hear the great effect it has on people. SL: However, not all of the feedback you get is positive, right? Kevin Allison: Of course, we get a lot of complaints about offending people. You know, we get a lot of email saying “Shame on you for having played this”. We’re always walking a tightrope because things that are politically incorrect or inexpertly or insensitively worded are kind of bound to pop up on the show here and there because we encourage people to speak so “uncensoredly”, you know, we don’t want people walking on eggshells, we want people being as unfiltered as they can be. So, occasionally, there are little brouhahas that pop up about that too because we do really want to be as compassionate as we can, as emotionally intelligent as we can about creating a show that is valuable to people rather than hurtful to people. So, we have to navigate that a lot as well. SL: You recently published the RISK! book, as well as a series of stories for Amazon, called This Can’t Be Happening, and with this and the ongoing live shows, what else do you want to accomplish with the show? Kevin Allison: Well, we would love to do another book. We would love to do more of the Amazon stuff and we’re starting to talk about film and TV. I can’t really speak specifically about all of that, but this year, at the very least, we’re entering into a lot of talks about that kind of stuff. I’ve always been apprehensive of taking on too much, because, I once had a lunch with Marc Maron. Marc was on the very first episode of RISK! in New York and then he was at the very first night that we ever did the show in Los Angeles. He’s always been a kind of friend of the show in a little bit of a mentoring sort of way. He said, “Whatever you do, if you do a book or you do TV stuff or whatever projects you might do, just make sure you keep the podcast – the audio podcast – going and keep it at the high quality that it always has been.” So that, I think, is the challenge looking forward because I do want to be tackling more. There’s a part of me creatively which just wants to be trying new things but at the same time, this show is very hard to produce. (Laughs) So, I want to make sure that we do it very mindfully. New episodes of RISK! air every Tuesday and can be found wherever you listen to podcasts. On Thursday, Kevin goes into the archives for RISK! Singles. You can follow the show on Twitter, and you can gain access to exclusive content and the full archive of shows by supporting RISK! on Patreon. The post Podcasts You Should Know: Taking Risks with Kevin Allison appeared first on Socialite Life......»»

Category: topSource: celebuzzFeb 6th, 2019

Brie Larson Teams Up with Jimmy Fallon on "The Tonight Show"s Virtual Reality Pictionary!

Brie Larson made an appearance on last night’s (August 9) episode of The Tonight Show, and participated in a super fun round of Jimmy Fallon‘s Virtual Reality Pictionary! The 27-year-old Oscar-winning actress teamed up with the 42-year-old host to face off against other special guest Marlon Wayans and The Roots‘ Tariq Trotter in the virtual [...] Brie Larson made an appearance on last night’s (August 9) episode of The Tonight Show, and participated in a super fun round of Jimmy Fallon‘s Virtual Reality Pictionary! The 27-year-old Oscar-winning actress teamed up with the 42-year-old host to face off against other special guest Marlon Wayans and The Roots‘ Tariq Trotter in the virtual reality version of Pictionary. Brie also promoted her latest film The Glass Castle, and shared a clip from a sketch she starred in for The Tonight Show with Jay Leno when she was just eight years old. That same evening, Brie joined her co-stars Naomi Watts and Max Greenfield at their The Glass Castle premiere. Virtual Reality Pictionary with Brie Larson and Marlon Wayans FYI: Brie is wearing an A.L.C. top and pants. Click inside to watch the rest of Brie Larson’s appearance on The Tonight Show… Brie Larson’s Career Kicked Off with a Sketch for Jay Leno’s Tonight Show.....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredAug 10th, 2017

Delta Work: The Socialite Life Interview

She may exude glamor and sophistication on the outside, but there’s a surprising, cheeky – and a little bit bawdy – side to busty beauty Delta Work. Wowing crowds in […] More The post Delta Work: The Socialite Life Interview appeared first on Socialite Life. She may exude glamor and sophistication on the outside, but there’s a surprising, cheeky – and a little bit bawdy – side to busty beauty Delta Work. Wowing crowds in her home state of California as a part of the legendary Dreamgirls Revue, this outrageous entertainer talks to us about her style inspirations and dishes about her fellow queens on RuPaul’s Drag Race! This “California Gurl” is definitely unforgettable! Socialite Life: I went to see the Dreamgirls Revue when I was out in LA recently and it was a pleasant surprise to see you there hosting the show. You were really awesome! Delta Work: Well, thank you! I host that show (at a club called VIP in Riverside, CA) on Fridays – I guess I’ve been there a year now. We have a lot of fun there, it’s a rotating cast of performers and I’ve actually been at that bar for eight years but it’s been my show for a year now. SL: There’s a lot of Drag Race alums in the Dreamgirls Revue – were they able to give you any advice for the show? Delta: Absolutely! I worked for a long time with Shannel in Las Vegas and also with Tammie Brown, a contestant from season one and then, of course, Raven. I also got to know Shangela and I’m really close friends with Morgan McMichaels. They just gave me advice about what to expect as far as like the press that’s coming and how to keep a level head with the work that we already do in town and then what’s going to come up out of town. SL: So, are you ready for the premiere and the onslaught of fans and press? Delta: I’m hoping that comes – I’m hoping the other seasons didn’t hog it all and now that season three’s here there’s not going to be any left for us! (Laughs) SL: I think it will be quite the contrary – it seems everyone’s really looking forward to this season! Delta: I think it should be a lot of fun. I think each season sort of amps it up a little bit more. More is expected and they push the envelope a bit. Also, this season there are a lot of entertainers who do this as their full-time job. SL: Is drag your full-time career? Delta: Yes, it’s my full-time job. I do it six days a week. SL: How did you get started in drag? Delta: Oh, probably on Halloween, like everyone else! (Laughs) It usually stems from there or somebody’s birthday party or somebody wants to just run around and act like a fool and have carte blanche to do that because they’re in disguise – so that’s probably where it started. .IRPP_minimalist { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#FFFFFF; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #141414!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist:active, .IRPP_minimalist:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_minimalist .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#000000; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } RELATED:  Chad Michaels - The Socialite Life Interview SL: And how long have you been performing? Delta: I’m going to say…I’ll be 35 in about a week…so, maybe 12 years? SL: How would you describe Delta Work? Delta: Oooh, that’s a good question! I don’t know – what did you think when you were at the show? SL: I didn’t know what to think! You came out looking glamorous and then you performed “Smell Yo’ D**k” and I was like, “Oh my God!” I think of you as “expect the unexpected”! Delta: I would think so, yeah. Essentially, people go out to a nightclub to have a good time and let loose  – and so they want to hear the top 40 or their favorite song from the 80s or whatever but I think our job sometimes is to sort of push the envelope and insert a little social commentary sometimes or pull things out of your hat that people kind of didn’t expect. Because they sort of expect you to do certain things – like if you’re Morgan, they expect one aspect and one aspect only but she’s capable of more than that. The same thing applies to myself – people sort of expect from an entertainer what they envision or what they’ve seen from other entertainers like them and when you go against that, sometimes people freak out a bit because they think that you have somehow escaped the cage that they’ve put you in. SL: Who are your inspirations? Delta: Jayne Mansfield, Peggy Bundy – not so much celebrities, but maybe characters that they’ve portrayed like Peggy Bundy or Suzanne Sugarbaker, Ginger from Gilligan’s Island – stuff like that. And, of course, red carpet trainwrecks like Sally Kirkland and Jean Kasem. SL: What do you enjoy most about performing? Delta: It’s definitely an extension – an outlet of who you already are, it’s an extension of that. You know, it’s good to see people who come and watch the show relax and get away from their problems for a little bit, so that feels good. And you have carte blanche to say whatever you want…I don’t want to say within reason – it’s permission. View this post on Instagram Dressing room tea and puppy. #deltawork photo snapped by my girl @psycadella A post shared by Delta Work (@deltawork) on Jan 23, 2019 at 5:35pm PST SL: What was your reaction when you go the call that you were going to be on Drag Race? Delta: I was completely blown away! I went blind, I went deaf, I s**t on myself, I smacked the person next to me….You know you realize that after season one – which was like a headhunt – they went and found the best. Season two was an application process and then season three is even a tighter application process – a lot of people dropped themselves out of the race immediately because they knew they didn’t have what it takes. When you realize, “Okay, I’m going to go ahead and do this” and then we had open call auditions and you had to do your tape and you’re thinking to yourself, “There’s a lot of really, really fierce people out there. Am I that fierce? Can I do this?” and then you really just have to throw caution to the wind and realize that, “Yes, I’m totally ready for this” and when you’re told that (you made the show), you just shrink into a little boy and you gush and you’re just like “Geez Louise, what have I just put myself on a course for? Obviously success, but what the hell kind of hurdles are coming my way?” SL: Since there was such fierce competition to get on the show this season – and it looks like the cast is really diverse and talented – what did you think when you saw your competition? Delta: You know, I’ve said this before and I really feel this way, you know they always say when you’re in some sort of contest “Everyone’s a winner”? It’s a nice thing to say but you want to be the winner. That’s the bottom line. However, when you’re at Drag Race, because all of these people are the best in what we do – if you are the best and the cream rises to the top, you have a professional nature about you – and the only way you got there was with some ability to be self-effacing and some level of being empathetic or sympathetic to others – and it’s just sort of holding your tongue. So when you get there, you realize that it’s a meeting of the minds. It’s the best of the best. It’s kind of like “drag camp”, it doesn’t feel like a competition – maybe that’s a good thing and maybe it’s a bad thing in the sense that if you don’t see everyone as a competitor, you’re losing sight of the fact that you’re in a competition. But when you’re there – and I don’t know if maybe it’s just a homespun thing – you have so much gratitude for being there. And, for myself, I was so eager to learn from everyone else – there were people there like India (Ferrah), who’s 23 years old and she’s been doing drag forever and she knows everything – she’s like a master craftsman at pretty much everything. She can sew, she can do wigs the best of the best, she can do all of those things – and then Raja’s 900 years old and she’s been doing it forever – so you can learn from every aspect – it truly is like “drag camp”.  It’s hard to size people up because I hold myself to a completely different standard than I hold anyone else. So, I figure it doesn’t really matter what everybody else is doing; as long as I’m on the top of my game then I’m going to make it to the top! SL: What is the most important thing you took away from this experience? Delta: I think the most important thing I took away from the experience is probably just to keep your eye on the prize and realize that you’ll always be friends but at times you have to realize…you know they always say “separate business and pleasure” kind of thing…we’re all friendly. I mean, you’re going to see catfights and you’ll see maybe more than catfights – if I don’t let out too much – and you’re going to see people hating on each other and loving each other – but at the end of the day, again, they’re in a competition. So, I would say what I left with was again, just keeping your eyes on the prize and if there’s a goal in life, you have to achieve it…sometimes your head has to speak over your heart. View this post on Instagram Good morning! I personalized this lovely MAXI and MAXI TOPPER from @wigsbyvanity in #mattelblonde. I love anything #wigsbyvanity stocks! #deltawork A post shared by Delta Work (@deltawork) on Jan 14, 2019 at 10:22am PST SL: What was it like working with RuPaul? Did you gain any pearls of wisdom from her? Delta: Well, Ru…I mean, let me tell you about Ru! Ru has so many little sayings and references that hold within them so much wisdom and sometimes you walk away from it thinking, “What did she just say?” And then you realize, “Ohhhh…”! They’re really pearls of wisdom – and when she’s serious about something, you know she’s serious. She has no problem looking someone dead in the eye and telling them exactly what she thinks – not to hurt their feelings, not to make fun of them, not to kiss their ass, but to tell them the truth about themselves and the truth about what you’ve done right and what you’ve done wrong. And working with Ru, you couldn’t ask for anyone better or higher in what we do. The goal is to essentially follow in Ru’s footsteps and those are big shoes to fill – no pun intended. She’s one of the most humble, genuinely interested people. She’s really, really smart and savvy and she’s just got her finger on the pulse of so many different things as far as music and television and all of those things; but at the same time, she’s got no problem sitting down and talking to you – and remembering you said to her the time before – even if there’s a million people talking to her, she can remember the last conversation she had with you – and that makes you feel really special. .IRPP_minimalist { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#FFFFFF; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #141414!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist:active, .IRPP_minimalist:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_minimalist .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#000000; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } RELATED:  The Week in Drag: Season 11 RuPaul’s Drag Race Cast Reveal SL: What are you looking to get out of being on the show professionally? Delta: I probably shouldn’t, but from time to time, I’ve been known to go on to the Internet…and already there are people blogging and saying some things and making references about who they assume that you are and there’s been quite a few of them who have said, “I can totally see Delta Work with a cooking show on Logo.” And I thought, “That might be kind of interesting”, but I don’t think I could be a “Barefoot Contessa” – I’d have to have pumps on! And when I was in high school, I was always into writing and I always had a passion for journalism so that could be interesting. SL: Are you planning on traveling and touring after the show? Delta: Oh yes! If somebody’s ready to book me, I’ll go – that’s for sure! It sounds so exciting. I’ve seen everybody else go and do it. I haven’t really traveled that much; I stay mostly on here on the west coast – Las Vegas, Palm Springs. I have my home base club here and if anything corporate comes up, I usually do that also. View this post on Instagram Iced tea with an iced tea spoon, salad with Catalina dressing, Topaze perfume from Avon, JAFRA Royal Jelly cream, Virginia Slims in a patch-work cigarette pouch. @ronniescharffer @psycadella you feel me? #deltawork #soisays Those glasses were vintage #rivegauche by #yvessaintlaurent gifted to me in Palm Springs. A post shared by Delta Work (@deltawork) on Jan 7, 2019 at 3:26pm PST SL: It says in your bio that you do a lot of charity work. Do you have a “pet charity”? Delta: No. I have to admit that I haven’t really made too much time for that and I’d like to use my appearance on the show as sort of a vehicle for that – maybe lend whatever celebrity that comes with being on the show that will attract people to hopefully making a difference. There’s some people who do have those “pet charities” but I live in a suburb of Long Beach, California and we have lots of different charities that I have friends associated with and I’d like to involve myself in that a little more. SL: What do you think separates you from the other queens? Delta: I think that would probably center around my age – I’m much older than the others so, you know, there’s isn’t much as far as gimmicks and cattiness and all of that stuff that I haven’t already experienced and realize that if you get yourself involved in that and you make that your focus, you definitely lose sight of stuff. There’s really no need for running around and bragging and showing out in the dressing room situation because essentially, it really doesn’t matter what you think of yourself. What really matters is what your fans think of you and I just have an ability – and it may be hard to do – but I think it’s always important to take the high road. It pays off in the end, it really does. SL: What would people be surprised to learn about you? Delta: Hmmm…that’s a good question. Gosh, I don’t even know! (Laughs) Let me think about that one…. .IRPP_minimalist { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#FFFFFF; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #141414!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist:active, .IRPP_minimalist:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_minimalist .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#000000; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } RELATED:  Latrice Royale – The Socialite Life Interview SL: One thing that surprised me is that you’re Mexican-American. Delta: I think that does surprise some people. Some people say that too, maybe because I look so different in and out of drag. So, for some people, they would consider me…what’s the term they use? I think the term that was going around was “coconut” – which is brown on the outside and white on the inside – because I don’t speak Spanish. But living in Southern California, that is kind of the nature of what goes on here. There are so many people whose families have all lived in Southern California for a long time – generations – that don’t speak Spanish. The only Spanish I really know is what I learned in school – I took four years of Spanish and I could barely get through ordering at Taco Bell! It’s got nothing to do with not being proud, it just hasn’t been necessary up to this point. I think it’s beautiful that people are able to speak more than one language. I probably should…well, I speak English and I speak drag – drag has it’s own language, completely! SL: When I saw you perform, you had a lot of different looks. Do you have a favorite look? Delta: I like any look that sort of lends itself towards something from the past. So, I like the 1940s still shots of celebrities like Gene Tierney and Lana Turner. I love those looks – they’re really simple but they’re really clean. I also love the 50s and early 60s the pulp fiction novels – the girls with the scarves around their necks and their hair is whipped creamy. I love that kind of look. I love Russ Meyer girls – I absolutely adore Russ Meyer girls! So, any of those looks that are kind of over the top – like the really pointy boobs and big hips – I think those kind of looks are really fun to wear and you don’t see too much of them, so I like doing that. View this post on Instagram Some people use their fingertips when they use @facetuneapp but I ball my fingers into a fist and pound the screen. #deltawork A post shared by Delta Work (@deltawork) on Dec 25, 2018 at 3:54pm PST SL: I loved the corset you had on during your show. Delta: I love corsets. I love wearing them. They can be painful at times – if you’re wearing the right one. A lot of girls wear them, and they mistake a bustier for a corset but when you’re really corseted and you’re wearing metal boning, you know what it’s like. I guess you know when you’re really wearing a corset when it was $400, it wasn’t $20! They’re so damn expensive! SL: Do you make any of your own costumes? Delta: I do make some of my own stuff. When I first started, I looked to shop off the rack but, when you’re my size and you do entertain, you can’t always wear off the rack. What I like to do sometimes is go out and look for something and see if I can take it apart and embellish it and make it look like more than it is or I’ll sit down and sew something. I’m completely capable of doing it, I’m just really lazy and I get really frustrated – that might be something people don’t know about me. I get frustrated really, really easily and I would much rather pay someone to do it right the first time than to sit down and spend money after money to make it happen. If I can’t make it and if you’ve seen me in it and it’s really fierce and it looks cool, it was probably made by my friend who’s a designer – Adam Magee. He is probably the only person who has not had sex with me who has seen me completely naked! (Laughs) Being naked can be very uncomfortable, especially if you look like a Shar Pei when your clothes are off! (Laughs) SL: How can fans stay in touch with you? Delta: They can find me on Facebook, I have a fan page. I’m not really on Twitter…I suppose I should do that. My Facebook fan page is run by someone else, but I do answer people back. I like to get on the computer when I come home from a show at 2 or 3 in the morning and just read up on what everybody’s doing, so that’s usually when I’ll be answering stuff if people want to send me a little note or something! You can find Delta Work on Instagram! Socialite Life debuted back in 2003. SL Flashback showcases some of our favorite content from years past. This article was originally published on January 20, 2011. The post Delta Work: The Socialite Life Interview appeared first on Socialite Life......»»

Category: topSource: celebuzzFeb 2nd, 2019

Brie Larson Shows Off Her Impressive Rock Climbing Skills - Watch!

Brie Larson is definitely superhero material! The 29-year-old Captain Marvel actress posted a video on her Instagram on Sunday (December 30). PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson In the video, Brie impressively climbs all the way across a tough looking rock climbing path. “My self tape for the role of Spider-Man? Narration [...] Brie Larson is definitely superhero material! The 29-year-old Captain Marvel actress posted a video on her Instagram on Sunday (December 30). PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson In the video, Brie impressively climbs all the way across a tough looking rock climbing path. “My self tape for the role of Spider-Man? Narration by @risemovement,” Brie captioned the post. She’s got some big fans in the comments too: Jennifer Garner commented with “Atta GIRL!!!” Watch below! View this post on Instagram My self tape for the role of Spider-Man? Narration by @risemovement A post shared by Brie (@brielarson) on Dec 30, 2018 at 3:38pm PST.....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredDec 30th, 2018

Brie Larson is Able to Push a Truck After "Captain Marvel" Training - Watch Now!

Training for Captain Marvel turned Brie Larson into a beast! The 29-year-old Oscar winner stopped by The Ellen Show to chat about her intense training before suiting up for the superhero film. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson “The on-going joke with him (trainer Jason Walsh) – because Captain Marvel can move [...] Training for Captain Marvel turned Brie Larson into a beast! The 29-year-old Oscar winner stopped by The Ellen Show to chat about her intense training before suiting up for the superhero film. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson “The on-going joke with him (trainer Jason Walsh) – because Captain Marvel can move planets – is that I told him ‘I just want to be able to move your car,’” Brie explains. “‘If I could just push your Jeep then I’ll feel like I was ready.’ And so it happened.” Brie then plays a clip of herself pushing her trainer’s Jeep up a hill – before Ellen scares her! Captain Marvel hits theaters on March 8. Make sure you catch Brie‘s interview on Ellen on Friday, February 1 on NBC! Click inside to see Brie show off her dancing skills….....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredFeb 1st, 2019

'Captain Marvel' Star Brie Larson Celebrates End of Filming - Comicbook.com

Comicbook.com'Captain Marvel' Star Brie Larson Celebrates End of FilmingComicbook.comCaptain Marvel star Brie Larson shared an image Sunday commemorating the end of principal photography on the upcoming Marvel Studios blockbuster. pic.twitter.com/qnZ5RnzDLM. — Brie Larson (@brielarson) July 8, 2018. The tweet shows an ...'Captain Marvel': Brie Larson Posts Wrap Photo Of Marvel's Next Big Superhero PicDeadlineCaptain Marvel Has Wrapped Filming, Here's How Brie Larson CelebratedCinema BlendCaptain Marvel: Brie Larson Commemorates End Of FilmingScreen RantBleeding Cool Newsall 19 news articles ».....»»

Category: topSource: googlenewsJul 8th, 2018

Brie Larson Gets Into Her Superhero Costume as "Captain Marvel" - See the First Pics From the Set!

Brie Larson is in superhero mode! The 28-year-old Academy Award-winning actress was spotted in costume for the first time as Captain Marvel on Wednesday afternoon (January 24) in Atlanta, Georgia. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie plays Carol Danvers, an Air Force pilot who gains superpowers after her DNA is fused [...] Brie Larson is in superhero mode! The 28-year-old Academy Award-winning actress was spotted in costume for the first time as Captain Marvel on Wednesday afternoon (January 24) in Atlanta, Georgia. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie plays Carol Danvers, an Air Force pilot who gains superpowers after her DNA is fused with an alien’s DNA following an accident. The movie is being directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, and is the first Marvel solo movie to focus on a female character. The movie is due to hit theaters on March 8, 2019. 10+ pictures inside of Brie Larson as Captain Marvel….....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredJan 26th, 2018

Brie Larson Films a Running Scene for "Captain Marvel!"

Brie Larson is hard at work on her highly anticipated film Captain Marvel! The 28-year-old Kong: Skull Island actress was spotted shooting an action scene on Thursday (April 26) in Los Angeles. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson She was joined on set by her stunt double, who matched Brie in her [...] Brie Larson is hard at work on her highly anticipated film Captain Marvel! The 28-year-old Kong: Skull Island actress was spotted shooting an action scene on Thursday (April 26) in Los Angeles. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson She was joined on set by her stunt double, who matched Brie in her green and black Captain Marvel costume. Earlier this week, Brie stepped out for the Avengers: Infinity War premiere, tweeting afterward, “WE SAW INFINITY WAR AND KNOW EVERYTHING THAT HAPPENS IN IT OMG.” Captain Marvel follows Carol Danvers as she becomes one of the universe’s most powerful heroes when Earth is caught in the middle of a galactic war between two alien races. Set in the 1990s, Captain Marvel is an all-new adventure from a previously unseen period in the history of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Don’t miss it when it hits theaters on March 8, 2019! In the meantime, see more set photos here......»»

Category: topSource: justjaredApr 27th, 2018

Fans Have Noticed Brie Larson's 'Captain Marvel' '90s Hair Style - Comicbook.com

Comicbook.comFans Have Noticed Brie Larson's 'Captain Marvel' '90s Hair StyleComicbook.comThe world got its first look at Brie Larson's Captain Marvel costume earlier today, and some fans are seeing one detail in a whole new light. A series of set photos have been making the rounds online, which show Larson in a green-hued version of her ...Brie Larson's Captain Marvel Has the Same Haircut We All Had in the '90sThe Mary SueSee the first photos of Brie Larson as Captain MarvelPage SixCaptain Marvel Set Photo Reveals Brie Larson in Green CostumeIGNall 54 news articles ».....»»

Category: topSource: googlenewsJan 25th, 2018

Brie Larson Wraps "Captain Marvel" Filming!

Brie Larson has officially wrapped filming for Captain Marvel! The 28-year-old Oscar winning actress announced the news on her Instagram account with a photo of her filming calendar. The calendar indicates that her last day of filming was on Friday (July 6). PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson If you missed it, [...] Brie Larson has officially wrapped filming for Captain Marvel! The 28-year-old Oscar winning actress announced the news on her Instagram account with a photo of her filming calendar. The calendar indicates that her last day of filming was on Friday (July 6). PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson If you missed it, be sure to check out some of the set photos we acquired of Brie filming for the upcoming Marvel movie. Don’t miss the film when it hits theaters on March 8, 2019! Congratulations on wrapping up the movie, Brie! A post shared by Brie (@brielarson) on Jul 8, 2018 at 1:35pm PDT.....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredJul 9th, 2018

Brie Larson to Join Michael B. Jordan in "Just Mercy"!

Brie Larson is set to take on an exciting new role alongside Michael B. Jordan! The 28-year-old Captain Marvel actress is in final negotiations to star in Destin Cretton‘s upcoming Just Mercy. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie previously worked with Destin on The Glass Castle in 2017 and Short Term [...] Brie Larson is set to take on an exciting new role alongside Michael B. Jordan! The 28-year-old Captain Marvel actress is in final negotiations to star in Destin Cretton‘s upcoming Just Mercy. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie previously worked with Destin on The Glass Castle in 2017 and Short Term 12 in 2013. Jamie Foxx is also on board for the project. The film is based on the book Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, and tells the true story of Bryan Stevenson (Jordan), a gifted young lawyer fighting for equal justice in a flawed legal system. It is not yet known which role Brie would play. Production is set to begin next month in Atlanta, Georgia......»»

Category: topSource: justjaredAug 8th, 2018

Brie Larson Shows Off Intense Workout Training for "Captain Marvel" - Watch!

Brie Larson has been putting a lot of time in at the gym! The 28-year-old Oscar-winning actress took to Instagram on Monday (March 27) to share a couple of videos of her intense workout as she trains for her upcoming lead role in Captain Marvel. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson “9 [...] Brie Larson has been putting a lot of time in at the gym! The 28-year-old Oscar-winning actress took to Instagram on Monday (March 27) to share a couple of videos of her intense workout as she trains for her upcoming lead role in Captain Marvel. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson “9 months of training really does some stuff to your body 😂😂😂 #mondaymotivation,” Brie captioned one video while doing pulling ups. We have published some Captain Marvel set photos from this week if you missed them! The movie is set to hit theaters on March 8, 2019. A post shared by Brie (@brielarson) on Mar 26, 2018 at 4:55am PDT Check out another video inside! Getting stronger is a process I’m committed to showing up for everyday. 💖💪💖 A post shared by Brie (@brielarson) on Mar 27, 2018 at 7:13am PDT.....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredMar 28th, 2018

Brie Larson Visits the Sao Paulo Museum of Art in Brazil!

Brie Larson is taking in the sights abroad! The 29-year-old Captain Marvel actress was spotted taking a stroll with her security team at the Sao Paulo Museum of Art (MASP) on Friday (December 7) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie looked chic in a polka dotted dress [...] Brie Larson is taking in the sights abroad! The 29-year-old Captain Marvel actress was spotted taking a stroll with her security team at the Sao Paulo Museum of Art (MASP) on Friday (December 7) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie looked chic in a polka dotted dress as she headed to her car after the museum trip. Earlier in the day, Brie was spotted arriving at Guarulhos Sao Paolo airport, flashing a big smile to photographers as she made her way through the terminal. Captain Marvel hits theaters on March 8, 2019......»»

Category: topSource: justjaredDec 8th, 2018

Brie Larson Suits Up as "Captain Marvel" in New Set Photos

Brie Larson was seen on the set of Captain Marvel in costume to film some new scenes! The 28-year-old actress got ready to film this week in the Los Angeles area for the upcoming Marvel superhero. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie is in the exact same costume as she was [...] Brie Larson was seen on the set of Captain Marvel in costume to film some new scenes! The 28-year-old actress got ready to film this week in the Los Angeles area for the upcoming Marvel superhero. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson Brie is in the exact same costume as she was back in January when we got the very first glimpse of her in character. The movie is due to hit theaters on March 8, 2019. Be sure to stay tuned as more set photos emerge from the set this week!.....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredMar 20th, 2018

Brie Larson Kicks Off "Captain Marvel" Press Tour in Singapore!

Captain Marvel has officially taken flight! Brie Larson got a big warm welcome as she hit the stage at the fan event for her anticipated film Captain Marvel held at the Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Centre on Thursday (February 14) in Singapore. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson The 29-year-old [...] Captain Marvel has officially taken flight! Brie Larson got a big warm welcome as she hit the stage at the fan event for her anticipated film Captain Marvel held at the Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Centre on Thursday (February 14) in Singapore. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson The 29-year-old actress was joined at the event by her co-stars Gemma Chan and Samuel L. Jackson, as well as writer-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck. Earlier that same day, Brie and her Captain Marvel crew rocked different outfits to attend their press conference and photo call for the film, which hits theaters on March 8. FYI: Brie is wearing a Max Mara ensemble paired with State Property jewelry......»»

Category: topSource: justjaredFeb 14th, 2019

Brie Larson Gets Hair & Makeup Touch Ups on "Captain Marvel" Set!

Brie Larson is back to filming Captain Marvel! The 28-year-old actress was seen getting some makeup and hair touch ups in between takes. Someone was also seen adjusting her Captain Marvel costume on the Los Angeles set this week. Check out the set photos below! PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson The [...] Brie Larson is back to filming Captain Marvel! The 28-year-old actress was seen getting some makeup and hair touch ups in between takes. Someone was also seen adjusting her Captain Marvel costume on the Los Angeles set this week. Check out the set photos below! PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson The movie is set to be released on March 8, 2019! Be sure to mark your calendars! See all the photos from of Brie Larson on the set of Captain Marvel in the gallery….....»»

Category: topSource: justjaredMay 9th, 2018

Brie Larson Runs to Meet Jude Law on "Captain Marvel" Set!

Brie Larson is so happy to see Jude Law! The 28-year-old actress was spotted running full speed to welcome the 45-year-old actor to the set of Captain Marvel on Friday (March 23) in Los Angeles. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson This is the first time Jude was seen on set, where [...] Brie Larson is so happy to see Jude Law! The 28-year-old actress was spotted running full speed to welcome the 45-year-old actor to the set of Captain Marvel on Friday (March 23) in Los Angeles. PHOTOS: Check out the latest pics of Brie Larson This is the first time Jude was seen on set, where he’ll be playing the role of Mar-Vell in the movie! The two had an awkwardly funny exchange: Jude tried to say hello to Brie, but she didn’t hear him and began walking away before realizing Jude was trying to say hey. She quickly ran to welcome him! Captain Marvel hits theaters next March......»»

Category: topSource: justjaredMar 23rd, 2018

Jenifer Lewis Talks Divas, Directors and Drag Queens!

The latest internet sensation is the hilarious new web series Jenifer Lewis and Shangela. The show stars legendary stage and screen diva Jenifer Lewis and one of RuPaul’s Drag Race’s most memorable queen-testants, Shangela. Jenifer is […] More The post Jenifer Lewis Talks Divas, Directors and Drag Queens! appeared first on Socialite Life. The latest internet sensation is the hilarious new web series Jenifer Lewis and Shangela. The show stars legendary stage and screen diva Jenifer Lewis and one of RuPaul’s Drag Race’s most memorable queen-testants, Shangela. Jenifer is a multi-talented entertainer and has conquered the stage and screen, appearing in such films as What’s Love Got to Do with It, Think Like a Man and Jackie’s Back. She’s also made over 200 television appearances on such shows as The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Girlfriends and In Living Color. Her distinctive voice has also been featured in a number of animated films like Disney’s The Princess and the Frog and Cars. Although I could have spent hours reviewing her incredible career – from her beginnings as one of Bette Midler’s Harlettes to her work with such esteemed directors as Spike Lee and Tyler Perry, we hit on the highlights and answered the burning question – how did this movie star manage to hook up with a fierce drag queen? Learn more about the new series and its star in our exclusive interview! Socialite Life: Thanks so much for taking the time to chat with us. Jenifer Lewis: It’s my pleasure. I’m very excited about the web series, so I’m happy to talk to you. SL: So, how did you get hooked up with Shangela? Jenifer Lewis: Well, I was doing a play with Meryl Streep at the New York Shakespeare Festival – it was Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children – and, DJ (Shangela) who, of course, was my biggest fan, clawed his way backstage to get to me and came in in the dressing room and he was just so excited. I said, “Sit down, tell me about yourself and tell me what you want to do with your life.” And he started talking. He had met all of his college friends in New York and they were celebrating, believe it or not, Jackie Washington Day. Jackie’s Back is a movie I made years ago – well, it has become an underground cult classic. (Ed. note: If you haven’t seen it, you should! Check out the trailer.) So he knew all of the lines of the movie Jackie’s Back and I was like “Aw, this is a sweet kid.” He was moving to Los Angeles and I said “Come on, I need an assistant.” And he moved into the lower level of my home – because I usually have a college kid there, a young kid, trying to help them out. The last girl who lived here was summa cum laude, double masters, double major, and she was just so smart. I’m always happy to give back, that’s basically the story. .IRPP_minimalist { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#FFFFFF; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #141414!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist:active, .IRPP_minimalist:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_minimalist .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#000000; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } RELATED:  Shangela: The Socialite Life Interview So DJ became my assistant and, lo and behold, he goes on RuPaul’s Drag Race and gets famous! (Laughs) So he comes upstairs all of the time and we just have fun around the house and people would come over and say “You need to capture this chemistry on film”, so we did! It’s just our sort of little gift to our fans, you know, just to have some fun with. It’s an exaggerated version of real life. But it is scripted and that’s what makes it special. The writers have been writing for me since I was in college at Webster University. Mark Alton Brown and Dee LaDuke, they wrote Jackie’s Back and they wrote for me when I was doing the series Girlfriends. They know my voice and they captured it all of these many years – even for my one-woman shows all over the world. SL: It’s easy to see why DJ would idolize you. You have had quite an impressive career, haven’t you? Jenifer Lewis: What can I tell you kid? I’ve had quite a career, yes I have! The hard work has paid off. And, for you kids coming up in show business, you need to know that the elevator to success is broken, you should take the stairs. I took the stairs and I really celebrate quite a diverse, multi-level, multi-cultural, multi-everything career. I get to work with so many different people in so many different genres. I sing, I act and I have a lot of versatility. I’ve always seen my talent as a gift and I’ve always tried to honor it the best I can. Of course, the road was rough, I came upon many challenges. But because I love what I do – it’s what I’ve been doing since I was five years old. I sang my first solo in church when I was five and I haven’t looked back since. From the reaction of the congregation, I knew what I wanted to be and that’s why I pursued this life of entertainment. SL: You act, you sing, you are a viral video sensation. Out of all of your talents, is there something you’re most passionate about? Jenifer Lewis: Oh, I definitely enjoy performing in front of a live audience more than anything. I just finished doing a one-woman show in New York. It was called Black Don’t Crack and the New York Times gave me a stellar review. I mean, it was such a love letter and I have to admit to you, it was the first time I picked up a newspaper and cried over something that was written about me. I was very humbled by it. It really was an unbelievable review. SL: Do you have any plans to take this show on the road or maybe record a DVD of it? Jenifer Lewis: I think we are going to record, sooner or later. We’ll be recording all of those songs because they’re mostly original tunes written by Marc Shaiman, who I’m sure you know. He is the executive producer of Smash, five-time Oscar nominee…well, he just happens to be my best friend. He was my musical director in New York, so I had that safety net. I knew if I were to fall, he would catch me. The chemistry and the entire show were magic. The entire time in New York was…there are no other words for it than it was triumphant and it was magical. That’s why I say to kids that you really need to work hard and focus on what your passion is in life and go after that. Because the rewards are…all I can tell you right now is that I’m just a happy person. Very, very happy. SL: What is the most rewarding experience you’ve had? Jenifer Lewis: Wow, that’s many, many things! I don’t even know how to answer that! I think starting off with Bette Midler, that was my first really big gig – being a Harlette with Bette Midler in the 80s. As a matter of fact, she just posted on Facebook a photograph of Bette, me and Charlotte Crossley. We were her backup singers on the very last Johhny Carson show. Can you imagine? Can you imagine being a little girl who’s an entertainer and wanting to go on not The Tonight Show but The Johnny Carson Show? Oh my God! Well, to sing and perform on the second to last show, talk about a dream come true. All that time wanting to go on there and then to finally get on right before he stopped hosting the show. Wow. I mean, now you talk about a dream come true. SL: Bette Midler seemed to have launched the careers of quite a few stars (Katey Sagal was also a Harlette). Did you think at the time, when you joined the Harlettes that you were going to be a star? Jenifer Lewis: Well, basically, (Bette) put me in my first movie, Beaches. I had a little part in that. I wouldn’t say that any one thing spun me off into a successful career. It’s a lot of things combined. You know, a lot of people think it’s just talent – it’s not. You have to know who you are inside of yourself. When I was diagnosed with bipolar, I really went and did the work. I went to therapy for 17 years – that’s what the whole show in New York was about. Having dealt with that and having come through and living a very happy and successful life now, that was hard work. You have to know who you are in order to enjoy your success. So often, especially these days, you don’t have to have talent to be famous. I mean really, you have to be young and skinny with a pretty face. But those pretty faces don’t last. That’s the thing, that’s the problem. And most of those kids don’t know who they are so they get all of that success and then they hurt themselves one way or another and that’s really what’s sad that’s happening. Back to what I have experienced with doing hard work and just learning to enjoy the gift. I had no idea I would never be this happy in life – with bipolar disorder you’re depressed most of the time or you’re completely over the top. And then to do the work and know that there’s a middle – that life can just be somewhere in the middle. Not perfect, not horrible, but somewhere in the middle where the depression and the pain dissipates. We’re never perfect and it never goes away completely, but you have a balance in life. You have a middle. And I’m very humbled and grateful that I made that choice to be better. You have to want to be better. That’s the first step to anything is to recognize that you have it and then make a good choice…to have patience – that’s very important. Have the patience to get better. Most people just go to therapy and say “Oh, that’s not helping!” Well, of course, it’s not gonna help if you don’t sit your ass there, you know. You have to have the discipline. I mean, what could be more important than taking care of yourself? If you don’t do that, you can’t enjoy it anyway! Better do the work! SL: I loved you in Girl 6. What was it like working with Spike Lee? Jenifer Lewis: You know, Spike is more of a technical director. He was very generous. I was like the Mother Hen. I was the oldest person on the set. And I really worked with the girls because a lot of them were first-timers. I think it was Naomi Campbell’s first movie and Theresa Randle was very young at the time. He really did allow me to work with the girls when we had our scenes – especially the table scene. It was so silly! (Laughs) Spike was great and he really knew what he wanted and it was a very professional set. You know, there was drama – there’s drama everywhere – but we had a good time. And it was also really nice to be working with so many females. There are not a lot of roles for female actresses together. There are not a lot of movies that are just us, you know? What I remember of filming that movie was having a really good time in New York and on set, it was very professional. (Spike) knew exactly what he wanted, I remember that. And we had fun! Remember the scene where we played George Jefferson and Weezy? Oh my God! That day we clowned, we had so much fun. It was nice to see Spike really let go and have fun there. We had a blast. SL: You’ve also worked a lot with Tyler Perry. What has that experience been like for you? Jenifer Lewis: Well, that’s my baby, what can I tell you? He was a big fan of mine and then, of course,  I became a big fan of his. I remember when they sent me one of the scripts early in his career. I read the script and asked “Who’s playing Madea? That’s who I should be playing.” And they said, “Well, the author is playing Madea,” I asked, “Who’s the author?” and they said “Tyler Perry” and I said, “Isn’t that a guy?” That was how I found out about it. When I met him and saw Madea, of course, there was no question as to who would play Madea! To talk about Tyler Perry, I think once again his professionalism is very admirable. I really admire him. When we go to Atlanta to film, Tyler treats us all like queens – and when someone’s very generous like that, you give them your all. We have such great chemistry together. I mean, the day I fell into the grave, (in Meet the Browns)  I went over to him and said: “Tyler, just let me fall into the grave.” And he said “Just dig a hole and let Jenifer fall. I’m not going to argue with her!” When you walk on to the set, you want to give. When a director is prepared and has treated you well with respect, you give them everything you have. He’s a great guy. Very generous. Tyler’s one of those guys who gives so much back. He’s such a charitable person. Every time I see him, I make sure he looks right in my eyes so I can tell him how proud I am of him. SL: When you’re working on a project, do you prefer having the ability to ad lib, or do you prefer to follow the script to the letter? Jenifer Lewis: I don’t think there’s a director I have worked with that has not given me to freedom to be spontaneous and ad lib. They welcome it from me – because they never know what’s going to come out of my mouth! I have to brag here a little bit and say that Jenifer Lewis is given freedom on the set with the writing. Most people in this business know that when I walk onto the set it’s not going to be 100%. I’m there to give 2,000%. And why is that? It’s because I love what I do and I really want to do my best. I really do. When people see Jenifer Lewis, they stop the remote because they know if nothing else, they’re going to get a good laugh. I’m going to do something “out of the ordinary” – and usually that “out of the ordinary” was not in the script. So I have fun with that. SL: Out of everything you’ve done, do you have a favorite role? Jenifer Lewis: Well, I have to admit that would be Zelma Bullock in What’s Love Got to Do with It. I had actually just fallen in love when I was filming that movie and there was no fear in me. You know that when you’re in love, you’re just floating around and just carrying on. And I did extra research on that character because Velma Bullock was from St. Louis and my mother has eight sisters and that character was pretty much created from three of my aunts who live in St. Louis – and a little dash of my own mother (laughs). And being a St. Louis woman myself, I really, really understood the character very much – you know, the whole dysfunctional thing that was going on in Tina’s family. I was very comfortable developing that role. .IRPP_minimalist { padding:0px; margin: 0; padding-top:1em!important; padding-bottom:1em!important; width:100%; display: block; font-weight:bold; background-color:#FFFFFF; border:0!important; border-left:4px solid #141414!important; box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -moz-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -o-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); -webkit-box-shadow: 0 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.17); text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist:active, .IRPP_minimalist:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; text-decoration:none; } .IRPP_minimalist { transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; } .IRPP_minimalist .ctaText { font-weight:bold; color:#000000; text-decoration:none; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist .postTitle { color:#000000; text-decoration: underline!important; font-size: 16px; } .IRPP_minimalist:hover .postTitle { text-decoration: underline!important; } RELATED:  The Week in Drag: Valentina Does Rent, Courtney Act Wins Big Brother and More! SL: What is next for you? Any future collaborations with Shangela? Jenifer Lewis: Well, you know, we filmed four episodes…webisodes…episodes for the web series! (Laughs) I think they are negotiating a new movie as we speak – but, of course, I can’t talk about it because I haven’t signed the dotted line yet. But things are going on. I may go back to New York in the spring with Black Don’t Crack…maybe. That’s not definite yet. I think I’m going to be filming a movie next month. Things are good! I want people to see this web series and enjoy it because it’s my baby. I produced it and it’s just a fun thing and I want people to have it so they can laugh and enjoy it. They’re pretty much getting Jenifer Lewis doing some foolishness and just relaxing and having fun. SL: The second episode of “Jenifer Lewis and Shangela” deals with recognition. I’m sure you get recognized all of the time. Jenifer Lewis: Girl, I can’t walk out of my house. I can’t even drive to the corner without someone blowing their horn and yelling “Hey!” You find out very early in life that (the recognition) goes with it. That’s part of it and anybody who doesn’t want to be recognized should not go into show business…hello! I enjoy when people come up and say hello because I appreciate them as much as they appreciate me. I mean, you have to love people to do what I do and like I said, performing in front of a live audience I love more than anything. SL: Do you have a special message for your fans? Jenifer Lewis: No matter what your passion is in life, know this. It’s when you’re hardest hit that you mustn’t quit! Thanks so much to Jenifer Lewis for taking the time to chat with us! The third episode of Jenifer Lewis and Shangela debuts today on the shows channel on YouTube. You can check out behind the scenes clips and more at the show’s Facebook page. Keep up with all things Jenifer Lewis on her Facebook page and Twitter! Socialite Life debuted back in 2003. SL Flashback showcases some of our favorite content from years past. This article was originally published on September 19, 2012. The post Jenifer Lewis Talks Divas, Directors and Drag Queens! appeared first on Socialite Life......»»

Category: topSource: celebuzzFeb 8th, 2019